Political Science

Political science majors graduate with an understanding of how political scientists think, gather evidence, process data, and reach tentative conclusions. You will develop an ability to critically analyze the political world, learn effective oral and written communication skills, cultivate problem solving skills, and be exposed to a rich variety of perspectives and ideas.

Experiential Learning Opportunities in Political Science
Wesleyan political science majors have numerous opportunities to engage in experiential learning. Political Science majors have opportunities to completing internships, attend political conventions, conduct polling research, and even participate in local political campaigns. Additionally, many courses are designed to allow students to apply theories and concepts to political events. For example, Dr. Buice’s Model United Nations course is popular on campus. It allows students to research UN countries and their issues and then debate and negotiate solutions.

Internships
Internships are an important learning experience. Our program has successfully placed students in highly competitive internships. For example, three students were recently select as Frasure-Singleton Interns.

 
          

 

Class Projects
Professor Robert Rupp’s courses offer students a variety of experiential opportunities. One of the most important, however, changed West Virginia law. A group of students successfully introduced legislation that was eventually passed by the WV House of Delegates and signed by Governor Earl Tomlin to change child sexual abuse reporting requirements.

 His students were able to predict the winner of the 2012 Presidential election.

 

During the 2010 election cycle, students constructed a website that provided information and predictions on state Senate and two other races. In addition, his first-year students researched the five Upshur County School Board candidates, posted information, and conducted interviews that aired on Wesleyan’s public access channel.

Political Science students have researched voter registration and turn-out and administer surveys to both Democratic and Republican state delegates. Students’ work has appeared on West Virginia public radio and various websites.