Courses and Academic Requirements

 

Criminal Justice:

Requirements for Criminal Justice Major

Criminal Justice majors are required to complete 39 semester hours.

36 semester hours, including CJUS 110, 112, 241, 260, 345, 360, 497; SOCI 252; PSYC 101; POLS 202; three hours CJUS electives; three hours from CJUS 395; Independent Study; or approved International Experience.

Requirements for Criminal Justice Minor

15 semester hours, including CJUS 110, CJUS 241, and nine hours of electives from CJUS, with six hours being at or above the 300 level.

CJUS 110. Introduction to Criminal Justice. 3 hrs.

A general overview of the criminal justice system including a description of its com­ponents: the police, the courts and corrections.

CJUS 112. Introduction to Policing. 3 hrs.

Overview of police functions and responsibilities. Examines the role of police in society, as well as police functions, subculture, community relations and discretion.

CJUS 188, 288, 388, 488. Special Topics. 1-3 hrs.

A course or seminar on selected topics within the discipline that is not otherwise rep­resented in the curriculum.

CJUS 230. Criminal Investigation. 3 hrs.

Introduction to criminal investigation procedures including theory of investigation, con­duct at the crime scene, collection and preservation of physical evidence, introduction to related forensic science, including the importance of DNA investigation in some cases, and follow-up legal investigation. Prerequisite: CJUS 110 or departmental approval.

CJUS 240. Juvenile Delinquency 3 hrs.

A survey of juvenile delinquency and the functioning of the juvenile justice system to include issues such as: theories of delinquency, youth subcultures, prevention, reha­bilitation, and punishment of youthful offenders. It will also explore issues important to the developmental years such as schools, peers, and family. Prerequisite: SOCI 101, or SOCI 114, or CJUS 110, or departmental approval.

CJUS 241. Criminology. 3 hrs.

An exploration of the classical and contemporary theories of crime causation, pre­vention, and punishment. Prerequisite: SOCI 101, or SOCI 114, or CJUS 110, or departmental approval.

CJUS 260. Criminal Law and Procedures. 3 hrs.

The history of criminal law, its development in the United States, elements of crime, law of arrests, and courtroom procedures. Prerequisite: CJUS 110 or departmental approval.

CJUS 320. Issues in Criminal Justice. 3 hrs.

Examination of topical issues that affect the criminal justice system, with an emphasis on problems and trends. May be repeated with different issues up to 6 credit hours.

CJUS 330. Domestic Violence. 3 hrs.

An exploration of the theoretical and empirical literature on violence in intimate relationships with particular emphasis on the role of gender. Addresses issues such as physical, sexual, and emotional violence against women, children, and domestic partners. May be credited toward a major or minor in Gender Studies. Prerequisites: CJUS 101 or 3 hours in Gender Studies, or departmental approval.

CJUS 340. International and Comparative Criminal Justice Systems. 3 hrs.

A survey of selected world criminal justice systems including police, courts, and cor­rections. Cross-national and cross-cultural criminality from several perspectives will be examined. May include study abroad. Prerequisite: CJUS 110 or departmental approval.

CJUS 345: Research Methods in the Social Sciences. 3 hrs.

A course focusing on scientific investigation and the design of program and practice research in the field of social science, with attention to the use of both qualitative and quantitative methods, the appropriate use of statistics, and a working knowledge of selected computer programs.

Prerequisites: POLS 101, SOCI 101 or CJUS 110.

CJUS 351. Drugs and Society. 3 hrs.

This course will critically explore licit and illicit drugs, and the effects of drugs on American society. It will examine drug trafficking, drug control policies, and the con­nections between drugs and crime.

CJUS 360. Correctional Institutions. 3 hrs.

An overview of historical and contemporary correctional philosophies, practices, and procedures in the United States. Prerequisite: CJUS 110 or departmental approval.

CJUS 395. Internship. 3 hrs.

Field placement in an approved criminal justice agency for integration of theory and practice. May be re-taken for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Pass/Fail grading. Pre­requisite: CJUS 110, sophomore standing, or departmental approval.

CJUS 396. Independent Study. 3 hrs.

Individual study and/or research on a problem relating to criminal justice. May be retaken to a maximum of six hours. Independent study proposal must be approved by faculty supervisor and department chair. Prerequisites: CJUS 101, departmental approval, sophomore standing.

CJUS 497. Senior Seminar. 3 hrs.

Capstone course in which students will research, write and present a major research paper on an approved topic. Satisfies advanced composition requirement for general studies. Prerequisites: Senior standing, completion of at least 15 hours in CJUS courses, including CJUS 101.

 

Sociology and Social Justice

Requirements for Sociology Major

Sociology majors are required to complete 39 semester hours, including SOCI 101, 225, 252, 243, 248, 345, 365, and SOCI 420; 3 hours from: SOCI 240, 241, or 339; 3 hours from: SOCI 110, 249, 305, POLS 232, 320, 325, 350, CJUS 340, or 3 hour International Experience; 9 hours SOCI electives.

Requirements for Sociology Minor

15 semester hours including SOCI 101, 248 or 243, 9 hours SOCI electives

Requirements for Social Justice Studies Major

Social Justice Studies majors are required to complete 45 semester hours, including SOCI 101, 102, 225, 243, 248 or 249, 252, 305, 345, 355, 365, 455; 3 hours from SOCI 395, which can be earned from an internship, approved International experience, service initiative, or independent research; POLS 347; 6 hours SOCI, CJUS, GNST electives.

Requirements for Social Justice Studies Minor

15 semester hours, including SOCI 102, 252, 355, 3 hours from SOCI 225, 248, or 243; 3 hours SOCI electives.

Social Justice Studies Concentrations

Students major in Social Justice Studies may elect to complete in a concentration in addition to their major. This is NOT mandatory. These concentrations are designed for students who wish to focus their studies in a particular area from a social justice model rather than a traditional minor.

Social Justice Studies Non-profit Management Concentration

The combination of Social Justice and Non-Profit Management will prepare graduates for advanced degrees and/or leadership positions in the rapidly growing Non-Profit sector.

15 semester hours including BUSI 136, 232, 234, 265, and ECON 110.

Social Justice Studies Environmental Justice Concentration

The combination of Social Justice and Environmental Science will prepare students for advanced degrees and/or work to improve sustainable environmental practices, community wellness initiatives, natural resource conservation, spatial analysis, and ecosystem management.

15 semester hours including PHIL 130, ENVS 130 and 330, SOCI 330, and POLS 328.

SOCI 101. Introduction to Sociology. 3 hrs.

An introduction to the sociological imagination and the discipline of sociology. A focus on the relationship between the individual and society. Explores social structure, collective behavior, socialization, culture, conflict and change.

SOCI 102: Introduction to Social Justice: 3 hrs.

This course is an introduction to social justice perspectives. Students will be introduced to practical applications of social justice, its history, the meanings of oppression and discrimination, and various disenfranchised and vulnerable populations. The course will explore select social movements and efforts to remedy social and economic injustice.

SOCI 112. Human Origins. 3 hrs.

Examines the origin and evolution of humans through the perspective of two subfields of anthropology, physical anthropology and archaeology. Focuses on the biological evolution of the human species with reference to the fossil record of Pliocene and Pleis­tocene man. Archaeology of early man and their relationship to biological evolution, the natural environment, and other primates, living and extinct.

SOCI 114. Introduction to World Cultures. 3 hrs.

An introduction to the study of different cultures, including ways of comparing and contrasting the structures of social relationships and belief systems that operate in dif­ferent cultural settings. A cross-cultural examination of variation in material culture, kinship, gender roles, marriage, religion, economic organization, social and political organization, linguistics, and global social problems.

SOCI 188, 288, 388, 488. Special Topics. 1-3 hrs.

A course or seminar on a selected topic within the discipline that is not otherwise represented in the curriculum.

SOCI 210. Appalachian Studies. 3 hrs.

A study of a rural region that includes discussion of the role of coal in the life of the region, poverty, community life, migration, folk arts and crafts, and social change. This course satisfies the United States Cultural Studies requirement of the General Studies Curriculum.

SOCI 216. Culture, Health, and Healing. 3 hrs.

In this course we will look at health, disease, healers, and healing historically, cross-culturally and comparatively. This includes distributions of health, illness, and health services across place and time; various types of healers, healing, medicine, and medi­cal institutions around the world and at different points in time, including so-called “alternative medicines” in modern countries. Students will also explore varying beliefs about the body, and about the nature and sources of health and illness, that are relevant to medicine. The course is designed to be taught at an introductory level- for people interested in social and cultural aspects of medicine and illness, those with a general interest in other cultures and their beliefs, and/or for nursing or premed students.

SOCI 218. Food and Culture. 3 hrs.

The purpose of this course is to expose students directly to anthropology and to the anthropological perspective by examining in detail one aspect of all cultures, food. Specifically, students will examine the role of food in culture, society, environment and economy through readings and hands-on engagement with world foods and food issues.

SOCI 221. Popular Culture. 3 hrs.

An exploration of the social implications of popular culture. Includes film, television, music fashion, books, magazines, the Internet, and other forms of entertainment. The course examines popular culture production, dissemination, consumption, and inter­pretation in the United States. This course satisfies the United States Cultural Studies requirement for the General Studies Curriculum.

SOCI 225. Social Stratification: Wealth, Power, Inequality. 3 hrs.

This course will examine social and economic inequalities, their effects on society, and on individuals. The primary focus is stratification by race, class, and gender in the United States, but other societies will be explored to provide a comparative and historical perspective.

SOCI 330 – Environmental Sociology. 3 hrs.

This course will discuss the relationship between human societies and the larger natural environment. It will provide insight into the relationships between environmental and social problems.

SOCI 240. Juvenile Delinquency. 3 hrs.

A survey of juvenile delinquency and the functioning of the juvenile justice system to include issues such as: theories of delinquency, youth subcultures, prevention, reha­bilitation, and punishment of youthful offenders. It will also explore issues important to the developmental years such as schools, peers, and family. Prerequisite: SOCI 101, or SOCI 110, or CJUS 110, or departmental approval.

SOCI 243. Race, Class, and Power. 3 hrs.

An analysis of structured inequality in the United States including political, economic, and social power structures, and the nature and extent of inequality (based on race, gender, class, ethnicity, sexuality, etc.). Topics include institutionalized forms of domination such as racism, classicism, sexism, and colonialism, as well as reactions to them. This course satisfies the United States Cultural Studies requirement for the General Studies Curriculum.

SOCI 248. Sex and Gender. 3 hrs.

Investigation of social categories of sex and gender. Feminist, social constructionist, phenomenological, ethnomethodological, sociobiological, and social psychological perspectives will be explored. Focuses on the creation of gender and sexual identi­ties, inequalities, cultural expectations, and cultural representations of sex and gender. This course satisfies the United States Cultural Studies requirement for the General Studies Curriculum.

SOCI 249. Sex and Gender in World Cultures. 3 hrs.

A cross-cultural exploration of sex and gender in the U.S. and other cultures. It explores the impact of sex and gender in past and present local and global structures. Students will explore the social constructs of sex and gender in the context of human evolution, biology, prehistory, and the current ideologies, including the sociobiological, social constructionists, ethnomethodological, feminist, and social psychological perspectives. Cross-cultural case studies will be used to illuminate the perspectives discussed and strengthen knowledge of social theory. This course satisfies the International Cultural Studies requirement of the General Studies Curriculum.

SOCI 252. Social Problems. 3 hrs.

An exploration of select modern social problems. Topics may include crime, violence, urbanization, racism, and poverty, among others. Discussion will focus on the defini­tions, causes, and consequences of social problems.

SOCI 255. World Prehistory 3 hrs.

An introduction to archaeology and world prehistory. A study of past cultures and societies through their material remains. It explores different varieties of archaeol­ogy and examines theory, methods, and techniques for investigating, reconstructing, interpreting, and preserving remains. Emphasizes archaeology as anthropology and the relevance of archaeology to modern human society and politics. We will also examine exciting discoveries that make the news during the semester.

SOCI 260. Forensic Anthropology 3 hrs.

Deals with search, recovery, and analysis of human skeletal remains. Provides an overview of the human skeletal system; explores the history, and theoretical foundation of forensic anthropology; and provides a hands-on approach to assessing ancestry, sex, cause and manner of death.

SOCI 305. Global Minorities. 3 hrs.

A study of selected racial and ethnic minorities in Africa, the Middle East, the former U.S.S.R., Latin America, and Europe. Major theories of racial conflict and interracial tensions throughout the world; methods of reducing tensions and working toward pluralism, assimilation or integration. This course satisfies the International Cultural Studies requirement of the General Studies Curriculum.

SOCI 321. People and Cultures of Middle America and the Caribbean. 3 hrs.

A survey of indigenous peoples and cultures in Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean. The course examines the persistence and change of indigenous cultures as they have intersected with broader social forces since European conquest and colo­nization. It explores the cultural, economic, political and religious aspects of life in ethnic, gender identities; political and economic processes; urbanization and migration; nationalism; religion and ritual; and indigenous social movements. This course satis­fies the International Cultural Studies requirement of the General Studies Curriculum.

SOCI 325. Sub-Saharan Africa from a Cultural Perspective. 3 hrs.

A survey of people and cultural groups in Africa south of the Sahara Desert. The course examines the persistence and change of indigenous cultures as they have intersected with broader social forces since European conquest and colonization. It explores the cultural, economic, political and religious aspects of life in this large and diverse re­gion. Themes that we will focus on include concepts of race, ethnic, gender identities; political and economic processes; urbanization and migration; nationalism; religion and ritual; and indigenous social movements. This course satisfies the International Cultural Studies requirement of the General Studies Curriculum.

SOCI 339. Deviance and Social Control. 3 hrs.

An examination of conceptions of deviant behaviors, beliefs, and characteristics in American society. Explores the relationship between deviance and social control, theo­retical explanations, and the importance of power in the labeling process. Prerequisite: CJUS 110, or SOCI 101, or SOCI 110, or departmental approval.

SOCI 345. Research Methods in the Social Sciences. 3 hrs.

A course focusing on scientific investigation and the design of program and practice research in the field of social science, with attention to the use of both qualitative and quantitative methods, the appropriate use of statistics, and a working knowledge of selected computer programs. Prerequisite: SOCI 101, POLS 101 or CJUS 110.

SOCI 355. Community Development. 3 hrs.

Intellectual roots of community sociology and contemporary community studies. Nature of community: its institutions, problems and processes, including growth, disintegration, and development. Sources of stability and stress in changing societies, consequences of planned and unplanned change; future trends.

SOCI 365. Social Theory. 3 hrs.

A review of the major classical and contemporary sociological theories and theorists. Prerequisites: 6 hours of SOCI courses, including SOCI 101, junior standing.

SOCI 395. Internship. 3 hrs.

Field placement in an approved agency for integration of theory and practice. May be re-taken for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Pass/Fail grading. Prerequisites: CJUS 110, sophomore standing, or departmental approval.

SOCI 420. Senior Seminar. 3 hrs.

Capstone course in which students will research, write and present a major research paper on an approved topic. This course satisfies the advanced composition require­ment of the General Studies Curriculum.

 

Political Science

Requirements for Major

Political Science majors are required to complete 34 semester hours, including POLS 101, 120; 202 or 305; 210 or 220; 331 or 332; one course from: 225, 232, 347, or 353; one course from: 240, 320, 325, or 350; 6 hours of electives (including one 3-hour elective at the 300 level or above); 345, 497 and 498.

Requirements for Minor

15 semester hours, including POLS 101, 120 and at least one 300-level elective.

POLS 101. American National Government. 3 hrs.

An introductory study of the development, powers, organizations, and processes of American national government, focusing on the structures and functions of the institu­tion, political parties and interest groups, and citizen participation in these structures.

POLS 120. Introduction to Political Science. 3 hrs.

A general introduction to the study of the sub-fields of political science, governments and nations, and the fundamental concepts, ideas, and issues in world politics, including e role of the United Nations and international law.

POLS 188, 288, 388, 488. Special Topics. 1-3 hrs.

A course or seminar on a selected topic within the discipline that is not otherwise represented in the curriculum.

POLS 202. State and Local Government. 3 hrs.

A study of local-state-federal relations, relations among states, and the structure and functions of state and local governmental institutions, organizations, and processes.

POLS 210 (also HIST 210). Parties and Elections. 3 hrs.

A survey of the role of political parties and elections in the modern American political system. The course focuses on the formation of political beliefs, the development of political parties, and trends in recent electioneering practices.

POLS 215. Constitutional Law. 3 hrs.

A course in the legal principles of the Constitution of the United States as interpreted by the courts. The case method is used.

POLS 220. The American Presidency. 3 hrs.

An examination of the American presidency and those individuals and forces which shaped its evolution. The course will examine how the power and roles of the American president reflect and affect American society and values.

POLS 225. Model United Nations. 3 hrs.

A brief history of the formation of the United Nations; discussions of the six principal organs and some of the other bodies of the United Nations system and their functions. The major part of the course focuses on the preparation of students to participate as delegates in a model United Nations General Assembly or Security Council meeting and/or any of its committees or commissions. This course satisfies the International Cultural Studies requirement of the General Studies Curriculum.

POLS 230. Gender and Politics. 3 hrs.

An in-depth examination of the scholarship on gender and political leaders and political participants, as well as an assessment of contemporary policy concerns that involve gender. This course satisfies the United States Cultural Studies requirement of the General Studies Curriculum.

POLS 232. International Relations. 3 hrs.

Theory of international relations; basic factors affecting the position and policies of states, such as geography and demography; nationalism; imperialism; technological and economic factors; conflicting ideologies; instruments of foreign policy, such as diplomacy, propaganda, military power and economic and military assistance; inter­national law and international organization.

POLS 240. African Politics. 3 hrs.

A study of the ancient and recent evolution and current political environment of African nations. Examination of both historical processes of political change and development and contemporary political institutions, practices, and policies. Attention to colonial era, nationalism, post-independence states and their intergovernmental relations. This course satisfies the International Cultural Studies requirement of the General Studies Curriculum.

POLS 305. West Virginia Politics. 3 hrs.

An intensive study of the governmental and political institutions and processes of West Virginia. Emphasis on the functions and interrelations of the branches of government, political parties and interest groups, and the state-local relationship.

POLS 320. Comparative Developed States. 3 hrs.

A comparative examination of government and politics in selected countries and areas which are generally considered to have high levels of political and economic develop­ment, such as the United Kingdom, France, Germany, and Japan.

POLS 325. Comparative Developing States. 3 hrs.

A comparative examination of the institutions and processes of government and society in selected developing countries and areas, such as India, the Middle East, Southeast Asia, Africa and Latin America. This course satisfies the International Cultural Studies requirement of the General Studies Curriculum.

POLS 328. Environmental Law and Politics. 3 hrs.

This course traces the development of environmental politics and law in the United States and provides an in-depth examination and analysis of current issues and problems in U.S. environmental politics and law.

POLS 331. Classical Political Theory. 3 hrs.

Reading, discussion and analysis of selected political and social theories from the Greeks to the Renaissance.

POLS 332. Modern Political Theory. 3 hrs.

Continuation of POLS 331, covering the modern period.

POLS 333. American Foreign Policy (also HST 333). 3 hrs.

A study of the formulation and execution of American foreign policy utilizing case studies of decision making.

POLS/SOCI 345. Research Methods in the Social Sciences. 3 hrs.

A course focusing on scientific investigation and the design of program and practice research in the field of social science, with attention to the use of both qualitative and quantitative methods, the appropriate use of statistics, and a working knowledge of selected computer programs. Prerequisites: Political Science major; sophomore stand­ing; POLS 101, or 120.

POLS 347. Human Rights. 3 hrs.

The concept of human rights and its practice in various nation-states. Particular atten­tion is given to prevailing concepts, institutions, problems, laws, and norms for the promotion and protection of human rights in the world today, including the rights of indigenous people, women and children.

POLS 350. Contemporary International Issues. 3 hrs.

Analysis of current international events. Exploration of contemporary conflicts and other international events and issues with political implications.

POLS 353. International Law. 3 hrs.

The nature and development of international law and compliance with it. Particular attention to the function of international law in the context of international conflict.

POLS 497. Senior Seminar. 3 hrs.

Advanced readings, discussion, and use of primary and secondary materials to write and present orally a major research paper. Methods will include the use of numeric data, speeches, and official government records. Satisfies advanced composition require­ment for general studies. Prerequisite: Senior political science major or permission of instructor.

POLS 498. Senior Comprehensive Examination. 1 hr.

Review and written and/or oral examination covering several areas in the discipline of political science.