Winter Visiting writers series, december 28-January 2

WV Wesleyan’s MFA will host a Visiting Writers Series during the program’s Winter 2014 Residency. These events are free and open to the public. The writers will be reading from their original work, and copies of their books will be available for sale. All readings will be held on Wesleyan’s campus in Loar Auditorium in Loar Hall of Music (see campus map, PDF).

Dec 28, 7 pm, Terrance Hayes is the author of four books of poetry: Lighthead (2010), winner of the 2010 National Book Award in Poetry; Wind in a Box, winner of a Pushcart Prize; Hip Logic, winner of the National Poetry Series, finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Award, and runner-up for the James Laughlin Award from the Academy of American Poets; and Muscular Music, winner of both the Whiting Writers Award and the Kate Tufts Discovery Award.

Dec 29, 7 pm, Diane Gilliam is the author of Kettle Bottom, One of Everything, and Recipe for Blackberry Cake. She is the 2013 recipient of the Gift of Freedom from the Room of Her Own Foundation.

Dec 30, 7 pm, Marie Manilla is the author of the story collection Still Life with Plums, a finalist for both the Weatherford Award and Foreword Reviews Book of the Year, and the novels Shrapnel, recipient of the Fred Bonnie Award for Best First Novel, and The Patron Saint of Ugly forthcoming from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt in June 2014.

Jan 1, 7 pm, Crystal Wilkinson is the author of two collections of stories, Blackberries, Blackberries and Water Street, a finalist for both the UK’s Orange Prize for Fiction and the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award.

Jan 2, 3:30 pm, Lynnell Edwards is the author of three collections of poetry, most recently Covet (Red Hen Press, 2011).

For more information about the readings, contact MFA Director Jessie van Eerden: vaneerden@wvwc.edu, 304.473.8329.

This project is being presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Humanities Council, a state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations do not necessarily represent those of the West Virginia Humanities Council or the National Endowment for the Humanities.